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Addison Cameron-Huff

City of Toronto Electoral Region
Addison Cameron-Huff

Candidate bio description

I’m a blockchain lawyer. Since 2014 I’ve been advising the people who are building the future, including the founders of Ethereum, Bitcoin core developers, and blockchain companies across Canada and abroad. I’m a sole practitioner in Toronto doing 100% blockchain law. In 2017-2018 I was the President of a leading blockchain software company where I managed a team of approximately 30 people. Further information about me is available at https://www.cameronhuff.com. I started my career in law as a summer student in BlackBerry’s technology licensing group then articled at McCarthy Tetrault. I have worked as a software developer and launched several online businesses, including a global law search engine that involved machine translation of foreign laws.

What inspired you to run for bencher this year?

Software is changing every industry. Lawyers need to understand technological issues and the legal regulator ought to have that understanding too. I can provide this input because of my many years as a programmer and a lawyer working for the technology industry (more specifically, blockchain businesses). As a bencher I will ensure that legal professionals don't miss out on the benefits of. technology.

What do you believe is the biggest issue facing the legal profession?

The number of people in Ontario who aren't being assisted by legal professionals is the biggest issuing facing our profession. Unserved/underserved people are a multi-billion dollar opportunity for licensees and a travesty for the affected people. We can do better as a profession and as a society.

What would be your first priority upon election?

Carefully reviewing the LSO's ongoing initiatives, staff reports, and projects. As a bencher I will be joining a long line of very smart people who have served the profession. After reviewing what's been done, my next priority will be to review what the profession thinks should be done in order to ensure that the LSO is responsive to the profession and the public. This can be accomplished through surveys, consultations, workshops, websites, social media, etc. We have tens of thousands of lawyers in Ontario who have great ideas about how the LSO should be run and I will ensure that those ideas are canvassed.

What do you hope to achieve over the next four years as a member of Convocation?

I hope to leave the LSO better positioned to tackle technological challenges. Software pervades our lives but is rarely mentioned by the LSO. As licensees, we deserve an LSO that understands the shifting technological landscape.

What's the most pressing concern for the profession in your region of the province?

All of the factors that cause people to leave the profession. The legal profession loses many talented people every year to other sectors, mental health issues, inadequate income (especially in areas outside of major cities), drug/alcohol issues, stress, burnout, poor client outcomes, etc. I think that one of the best lenses to view the profession is through the eyes of the people who leave it. I recently met a medical student who quit the profession shortly after becoming licensed. We're losing great people to other careers, and we're losing great people to a wide variety of factors that make law a poor choice for them. More can be done to ensure that law is a rewarding career for as many people as possible.

Do you support the requirement to create and abide by a statement of principles?

This issue has caused major division within the legal profession but has received almost no attention outside of legal circles. I think the public would be better served by focusing on other issues. The LSO must get a handle on the SOP issue and find a resolution that satisfies licensees so that everyone can move on to the issues that matter. I understand the positive intentions of the LSO in creating the SOP requirement, and I understand the objections that some members of the profession have raised. I suspect there is a resolution to this issue that accomplishes the spirit of the SOP but with a different approach. But this would not be a focus of my term as bencher.

Poll Question


The Law Society of Ontario is in the midst of a major overhaul of the role of paralegals in family law — and a proposal on the issue could become an imminent issue for the regulator’s newly elected benchers. Do you agree with widening the scope of family law matters that paralegals can address?